How You Spend Your Days: Chaplain tracks numbers that really count

By Mark Mitera, Hospice Chaplain, Athens, Ohio

Just to satisfy my own curiosity about how I’m spending my time during the week, I’ve been tracking the following statistics for July – December 2018:

(1) Total number of hours of direct patient contact: 478.65 hours.
(2) Total work days this period: 113
(3) Hours per day of direct patient contact: 4.24 hours per day.
(4) Number of patients visited: 489
(5) Average length of visit: 0.98 hours per patient.
(6) Number of deaths: 107
(7) Number of funerals conducted: 9
(8) Number of Bibles given to patients: 28

One of my blessings is the increase in the number of hospice patients I am seeing on a regular basis. During my last report, I asked you to be praying that the Lord would allow me to see more of the patients on our hospice census. I was seeing approximately 70% at that time.

As of this past month, I am now seeing 85% of my patients and feel that I’m having a significant impact in their lives. I give all the glory to God for making this happen, because there is nothing different that I am doing. If I offer spiritual care to a person and they decline, then I need to honor their desire and not see them. I thank you for your prayers and ask that you continue to pray for me in this area.

Another blessing is being able to preach at two small country churches in my area twice per month. Although I make it clear that I’m a CBAmerica chaplain, the United Methodist Church (UMC) District Office is glad to use me for pulpit supply. Since this past July, I have been preaching a 9:30 service at Bates UMC (with attendance of 20-25), followed by a 10:45 service at Shade UMC (with attendance of 15-20). They are small in numbers, but I’ve come to love the people there, and they call me their pastor even though I only preach there every other week. One visitor even commented that the service felt more like a Baptist service (like her Baptist church in Florida)!

Please pray for me that the Lord will continue to use me to faithfully preach his Word. Also pray for the people in these small churches that they will be encouraged, that they will grow in their faith, and that they will be motivated to effectively share their faith with others.

I also consider it a great blessing for me to minister to my hospice patients, to be able to clearly share the gospel with them, and to be able to pray for them that they would truly come to know and love the Lord before it is too late for them. We have lost 107 of our patients in the past six months, and many people outside of hospice can’t understand how I can continue doing this ministry. It is only by God’s grace that I continue to do this work of ministry. Rather than focusing on the terminal illnesses of all my patients and realizing that they will possibly die within the next six months, I consider it a privilege to be able to spend a short amount of time with them through meaningful conversation, spiritual music, Bible reading and prayer.

Please pray for my hospice patients that they might call on the Lord in their time of need, and that they might come to truly know and love Him.

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Join us in praying for Chaplain Mitera’s hospice and pulpit supply ministry. May he and our other 195 CBAmerica chaplains continue to follow the example of the Lord Jesus who came to seek and to save those who are lost and dying.

For more stories by and about chaplaincy ministries, go to www.cbamerica.org/chaplaincy.  For information on chaplain endorsement, email Andy Meverden, Director of Chaplaincy at chapandy@cbamerica.org.

 

One Reply to “How You Spend Your Days: Chaplain tracks numbers that really count”

  1. Chaplain e paMitera, I am a Volunteer Chaplain at Hercules police Department. Thes past three years, with my wife Naomi who is a registered Nurse in Philippines, I served 2- WW II Veterans: Mark Tison Wilson (2-years & 8-months, & Johnny Espano (nearly 5-months), Naomi’s father. The former was placed under Hospice in the last 6-months before his demise. The latter died after several months of “hospice” symptomatic health predicament. Both were in Live-in Care-give job situations. With that experience & on-the-job training, can I qualify to serve with CB as a Chaplain? If you are in need of more Chaplains, count me in. My wife can be serve with me as my Chaplain’s partner. Especially with her formal training.

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